Five Things Indians Need To Understand About Camping

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Camping at distant lands is like one of the vacation goals for the modern Indian travellers. Whether it is the luxury camping in the dunes of Jaisalmer or high altitude camping in the tourist destinations of Himachal and Uttarakhand, there is one thing that is common for both is that Indians don’t understand the concept of camping and community living.

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I had a chance to visit the a music festival in the North East India. The festival takes pride in its high altitude camping at a secluded location creating a tribe like atmosphere. The attitude of Indian tourists was so different than the European ones. This encounter prompted me to write this blog.

Disclaimer: I don’t mean to demean any traveller in any way. I have trekked and travelled with many amazing Indian travellers who have made sure that they leave their campsite in the same way they arrive. But that crowd consists of just one percent of the kind of people I am talking in this blog.

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CLEAN YOUR CAMPSITE WHEN YOU LEAVE!!! – So you get a clean campsite with everything given the way you expect them to be, then why do you leave your campsite in a messy way. At the end of the camping period at multiple events, I have seen the European and the American tourists picking their garbage and dumping it properly. The Indian tourists simply leave everything from candy to condoms lying in the proximity of their campsite.

Water is a privilege – Campsite usually come with the concept of shared toilet tents unless you are taking a luxury tent in the dunes of Jaisalmer. Even in Jaisalmer, the water is scarce and it takes a lot of effort to bring water to that place. A intelligent idea of being at a campsite is that you use minimal water for cleaning up and then consider that there are at least 20 people waiting behind you. At a luxury campsite, it becomes even worse because the water consumption is equally distributed in all the tents and it is expected that it will be used wisely.

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Campsite manager is not your servant or errand boy – The person who manages the campsite has to go through worst. He has to look after demands of every person at that campsite and makes sure that they go happily without any complains. While he is there at your service, doesn’t make him someone that you get freedom to shout and threaten because your tiny demands are not being met. You are living at a campsite usually away from the main civilization. Doesn’t matter how hard they try to make everything perfect, things will go wrong and they often do. Be a little considerate towards your fellow human being.

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A two person tent accommodates two people and a rucksack, nothing more than that – This is very funny and everything I am at a camping event, this gives me a big time OCD. People arrive at the campsite with huge luggage, bags and suitcases. At least I have seen this at music festivals. Then they end up complaining that the tent was too small for their entire luggage. A Quenchua T2 is designed in such a way that it will accommodate two people with two big rucksacks but if you expect that your travel trolly will fit in their too then you are in for some disappointment my friend.

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Camping infographic blog

Like water, the ration is also limited – Complaining about how the campsite owner only gave you five chapatis and a little rice? Then, you should stay away from any camping event. I have met people who complain about little food and then tell that they have paid and can pay extra for more food. When you are at a high altitude trek, it takes a lot of effort to prepare the meal and money won’t make things easier or faster.

If you are planning to go on a camping trip in the coming months then be a little open minded and see how things turn out for you. Also, please clean your tent before you leave.

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50 thoughts on “Five Things Indians Need To Understand About Camping

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  1. I haven’t been camping in quite some time, but these are great tips! I know the last time we went camping, the tent next to us left all of their trash when they left! The campsite manager was so pissed! We helped clean it up before we left!

  2. The last time I did any sort of camping was when I was in university. I think another camping trip should be in order to just be able to experience all of it again.

  3. I only like camping when I have access to bathrooms and food. I suppose you’d call that glamping. I’m just not big on sleeping out in nature without proper food.

  4. I have to admit I’ve not been camping since my teens and not sure I would do it again. I like my comforts too much especially now I have a lot of pain. It does sadden me when people don’t leave areas as they found them.

  5. There is nothing I dislike more than people who complain when they know resources are limited and people are all doing the best they can under the circumstances. Great post

  6. Wow there’s many things for me to learn about camping – I have no experience in this. Very interesting and educational read. Keeping the campsite clean is everyone’s responsibility!

  7. Great tips for camping, haven’t been camping in years, not a big fan but I’m sure those who are will find these useful

  8. I am an Indian and lived in India till I was 24 however I have never camped in India, though I am from Himalyan state. I started camping in California and it also bothers me when I see pictures of people camping in India.

    Excuse me for stereotyping however I have observed polar difference in people from rest of India vs people from mountains of India. We mountain people respect nature and we understand the actual meaning of being in nature while just doing nothing. Most of other folks in India come to mountains to see snow, see mountains, getting drunk, smoke hash/ marijuana in Himachal and create nuance. I can totally see most of those guys expecting five star hotel with comfy bed.

    In the end I have concluded that most of Indian people don’t actually know the real meaning of fun, its more like picnic to them.

    1. Yes, even I agree with this. But somehow I really find it weird that campsite owners who are living in mountains too don’t ask tourists to prevent this habit.

  9. I love camping. I think you really need a good tent whenever you do one. Also, some great supplies for few days.

  10. We’re not fans of camping and the last time we did, we were both teenagers. Interesting to learn that so many Indians treat the camping managers as cleaning persons…

  11. We are traveling the world by bicycle, we do mostly wild camping. We haven’t been in India yet but I can say Indonesia and Kazakhstan were very similar to what you describe. I remember once we were camping on a very beautiful lake in Kazakhstan, lot of families there and also a class with their teacher, at the moment they had to leave the students asked the teacher where they had to put the garbage and the teacher just told them to throw it on the ground…

  12. I love traveling and camping in the great outdoors. I’ve not experienced what you have outlined, but in general I think camp sites should be left the same way they were in upon arrival.

  13. I havent been camping since I went with my Girl Scout Troop in 3rd grade! LOL. I do agree with your tips though; cleaning up after yourself is so important, not just for the environment, but out of courtesy for the other campers.

  14. I have to agree with the part about leaving your campsite clean, I’ve seen way too many people create a whole lot of mess, expecting someone else to clean up behind them and that’s so not right! Also, treating the camp manager as your errand boy, I hate it when people do that. You’re not here on a luxury resort vacation you know!

  15. This sounds amazing! I want to do something like this with my son. He is so passionate about camping, I want to take him soon.

  16. I don’t camp often so I would have no idea. I hate it in general when people don’t clean up after themselves though!

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